Table of Contents: Critical essays on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Courage Classics Sherlock Holmes Reader by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle with Essays HC

The fifteen Sherlock Holmes stories reprinted in this volume are generally held to be the most significant, innovative and influential tales featuring Arthur Conan Doyle's archetypal detective. Drawn principally from the first three Holmes collections, these selections are each followed by a concise commentary on its relation to Doyle, other Holmes tales, and the genre of detective fiction. The nine accompanying essays, which reflect the recent critical interest in Holmes, examine the stories from a variety of contemporary critical perspectives. The first five essays (by Martin Priestamn, Peter Brooks, Gian Paolo Caprettini, John A. Hodgson , and Alastair Fowler) focus in questions of narrative, deduction, and plot; the next four (by Stephen Knight, Catherine Belsey, Rosemary Hennessey and Rajeswari Mohan, and Audry Jaffe) social, historical, ideological, and gender issues. Each critical essay is preceded by a headnote that discusses the essay's critical approach. An introduction by the editor discusses the relation of Sherlock Holmes to Doyle's own life, reviews the history of the stories' publication and reception, and provides a brief overview of the contemporary critical essays. Additional sources of enrichment and direction for further study are provided by the four appendices: a chronology of Doyle's life; a note on Doyle's favorite Holmes stories; an annotated bibliography of aholmes collections and critical studies; and a list of film and video versions of the stories in the book.

The fifteen Sherlock Holmes stories reprinted in this volume are generally held to be the most significant, innovative and influential tales featuring Arthur Conan Doyle's archetypal detective. Drawn principally from the first three Holmes collections, these selections are each followed by a concise commentary on its relation to Doyle, other Holmes tales, and the genre of detective fiction. The nine accompanying essays, which reflect the recent critical interest in Holmes, examine the stories from a variety of contemporary critical perspectives. The first five essays (by Martin Priestamn, Peter Brooks, Gian Paolo Caprettini, John A. Hodgson , and Alastair Fowler) focus in questions of narrative, deduction, and plot; the next four (by Stephen Knight, Catherine Belsey, Rosemary Hennessey and Rajeswari Mohan, and Audry Jaffe) social, historical, ideological, and gender issues. Each critical essay is preceded by a headnote that discusses the essay's critical approach. An introduction by the editor discusses the relation of Sherlock Holmes to Doyle's own life, reviews the history of the stories' publication and reception, and provides a brief overview of the contemporary critical essays. Additional sources of enrichment and direction for further study are provided by the four appendices: a chronology of Doyle's life; a note on Doyle's favorite Holmes stories; an annotated bibliography of aholmes collections and critical studies; and a list of film and video versions of the stories in the book.

Description : Starting with William Godwin's Caleb Williams and Charles Brockden Brown's Edgar Huntly, this book covers in detail the great works of detective fiction--Poe's Dupin stories, Conan Doyle's The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Christie's The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Sayers' Strong Poison, Chandler's The Big Sleep, and Simenon's The Yellow Dog. Lesser-known but important early works are also discussed, including Wilkie Collins' The Woman in White, Emile Gaboriau's M. Lecoq, Anna Katharine Green's The Leavenworth Case and Fergus Hume's The Mystery of a Hansom Cab. More recent titles show increasing variety in the mystery genre, with Patricia Highsmith's criminal-focused The Talented Mr. Ripley and Chester Himes' African-American detectives in Cotton Comes to Harlem. Diversity develops further in Sara Paretsky's tough woman detective V.I. Warshawski in Indemnity Only, Umberto Eco's medievalist and postmodern The Name of the Rose and the forensic feminism of Patricia Cornwell's Postmortem. Notably, the best modern crime fiction has been primarily international--Manuel Vasquez Montalban's Catalan Summer Seas, Ian Rankin's Edinburgh-set The Naming of the Dead, Sweden's Stieg Larsson's The Girl with a Dragon Tattoo and Vikram Chanda's Mumbai-based Sacred Games.

Orel, Harold, ed. Critical Essays on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. New York: G. K. Hall, 1992.

The novel is particularly interesting for its two main themes: the rise of the English middle class and of English patriotism. The White Company depicts a world where individuals are judged not by their birth but by their accomplishments, in much the same manner as Doyle rose from poverty to affluence through his own efforts. The book, however, also reflects its author’s belief that the English character was the best in the world; Doyle clearly insists that the language, history, customs, and beliefs of England are far superior to those of any other nation.

Critical essays on arthur conan doyle. College paper Service

Description : Many engage in the quest, but no biographer yet has captured the enigmatic Doyle. Conan Doyle deliberately obscured his life, and his heirs remain keen to guard his papers. Yet the contributors—Conan Doyle scholars and collectors, English literature professors, research librarians, editors, and critics—concur that better biographical material is needed and that now—100 years after the birth of Sherlock Holmes—is an appropriate time to examine the biographical problems. They concentrate on the ways Conan Doyle himself and his biographers have handled these problems—or failed to handle them. In the process of evaluating and criticizing earlier biographical efforts, the contributors present an effective portrait of Conan Doyle. All agree, however, that much more remains to be done, and they suggest fruitful areas for further research.

1930) was a Scottish physician, ..

Sherlock Holmes. Dr. Watson's Christian Name / Dorothy L. Sayers. Ring for Our Boots / Arthur Marshall. The Importance of Being Watson / Peter V. Conroy. The Case of the Great Detective / Stephen Knight. Sherlock Holmes, Order, and the Late-Victorian Mind / Christopher Clausen. The Case of the Domesticated Aesthete / Paul Barolsky. Inside and Outside Sherlock Holmes: A Rhapsody / Kim Herzinger. The Medical Model / Pasquale Accardo. The Comic in the Canon: What's Funny about Sherlock Holmes? / Barrie Hayne. "The Colorless Skein of Life": Threats to the Private Sphere in Conan Doyle's A Study in Scarlet / Lydia Alix Fillingham --

The hero of The White Company, after whom Doyle later named his eldest son, is Alleyne Edricson, a landless young squire who leaves the monastery where he has been reared with his two companions, the lapsed monk Hortle John and the former serf Samkin Aylward, to join the White Company under the command of Sir Nigel Loring. Alleyne, his friends, his leader, and later his prince represent a microcosm of English society in the Middle Ages, depicting an idealized vision of the English character and contrasting with that of the country’s main enemies: the French, the Spanish, and the Germans. Departing from his usual historical accuracy, Doyle presents the Germans as the worst foes of the English, reflecting his own late Victorian perspective. Alleyne and his friend are mercenaries who live by their wits, but their fighting, looting, and pillaging are always conducted according to the rules of the chivalric game. At the end of the novel, Alleyne wins his knighthood, his inheritance, and his lady fair in the person of Sir Nigel’s daughter Maude. The virtues Sir Nigel embodies and Alleyne learns are those that Doyle taught his own sons: sympathetic treatment of social inferiors, courtesy and respect for women, and honesty in financial dealings.

Some fictional characters associated with Sherlock Holmes are not part of the Conan Doyle canon and were created by other writers.

Search Background Check, Arrest Records, Phone & Address Online.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was a Scottish novelist. He is best known for his Sherlock Holmes stories, such as The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892) and The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902). His fictional detective was based on Dr Joseph Bell (1837-1911) a professor at Edinburgh University (who both RLS and Conan Doyle knew).


Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes: Biographical and Critical Contexts PART I

An excellent and varied anthology that includes Stephen Knight’s “The Case of the Great Detective” and other oft-cited pieces on Sherlock Holmes. Also includes pieces on the other fiction and Conan Doyle’s place in the literary canon. Begin here for an overview of critical opinion on Conan Doyle. Authors include Dorothy L. Sayers, Andrew Lang, Arthur Morrison, and Lydia Alix Fillingham.