Your search returned over 400 essays for "religious tolerance"

Your search returned over 400 essays for

Walzer, and have discussed the paradox of tolerating intolerance. Walzer asks "Should we tolerate the intolerant?" He notes that most minority religious groups who are the beneficiaries of tolerance are themselves intolerant, at least in some respects. Rawls argues that an intolerant sect should be tolerated in a tolerant society unless the sect directly threatens the security of other members of the society. He links this principle to the stability of a tolerant society, in which members of an intolerant sect in a tolerant society will, over time, acquire the tolerance of the wider society.

Walzer, and have discussed the paradox of tolerating intolerance. Walzer asks "Should we tolerate the intolerant?" He notes that most minority religious groups who are the beneficiaries of tolerance are themselves intolerant, at least in some respects. Rawls argues that an intolerant sect should be tolerated in a tolerant society unless the sect directly threatens the security of other members of the society. He links this principle to the stability of a tolerant society, in which members of an intolerant sect in a tolerant society will, over time, acquire the tolerance of the wider society.

Although states that taught "the path to the supreme goal of the holy life is made known only in his own teaching", Buddhists have nevertheless shown significant tolerance for other religions: "Buddhist tolerance springs from the recognition that the dispositions and spiritual needs of human beings are too vastly diverse to be encompassed by any single teaching, and thus that these needs will naturally find expression in a wide variety of religious forms." said in (1871): "The Buddhists have founded no Inquisition; they have combined the zeal which converted kingdoms with a toleration almost inexplicable to our Western experience."

The process of legislating religious toleration went forward, while philosophers continued to discuss the underlying rationale.

(1632–1677) was a Dutch Jewish philosopher. He published the anonymously in 1670, arguing (according to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) that "the freedom to philosophize can not only be granted without injury to piety and the peace of the Commonwealth, but that the peace of the Commonwealth and Piety are endangered by the suppression of this freedom", and defending, "as a political ideal, the tolerant, secular, and democratic polity". After , Spinoza opted for tolerance and freedom of thought in his conclusion that "every person is in duty bound to adapt these religious dogmas to his own understanding and to interpret them for himself in whatever way makes him feel that he can the more readily accept them with full confidence and conviction."

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Although states that taught "the path to the supreme goal of the holy life is made known only in his own teaching", Buddhists have nevertheless shown significant tolerance for other religions: "Buddhist tolerance springs from the recognition that the dispositions and spiritual needs of human beings are too vastly diverse to be encompassed by any single teaching, and thus that these needs will naturally find expression in a wide variety of religious forms." said in (1871): "The Buddhists have founded no Inquisition; they have combined the zeal which converted kingdoms with a toleration almost inexplicable to our Western experience."

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Pluralism and tolerance of diversity are built into theology India's long history is a testimony to its tolerance of religious diversity. came to with St. Thomas in the first century CE, long before it became popular in the West. came to India after the was destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE and the Jews were expelled from their homeland. In a recent book titled "Who are the Jews of India?" (University of California Press, 2000), author observes that India is the only country where the were not persecuted. The chapter is one of the happiest of the . Both Christians and Jews have existed in a predominant Hindu India for centuries without being persecuted. Zoroastrians from (present day ) entered India in the 7th century to flee Islamic conquest. They are known as in India. The are an affluent community in the city of without a sense of having been persecuted through the centuries. Among the richest business families in India are the Parsis; for example, the controls a huge industrial empire in various parts of the country. , the powerful Prime Minister of (1966–77; 1980–84), was married to , a Parsi (no relation to ).

Pluralism and tolerance of diversity are built into theology India's long history is a testimony to its tolerance of religious diversity. came to with St. Thomas in the first century CE, long before it became popular in the West. came to India after the was destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE and the Jews were expelled from their homeland. In a recent book titled "Who are the Jews of India?" (University of California Press, 2000), author observes that India is the only country where the were not persecuted. The chapter is one of the happiest of the . Both Christians and Jews have existed in a predominant Hindu India for centuries without being persecuted. Zoroastrians from (present day ) entered India in the 7th century to flee Islamic conquest. They are known as in India. The are an affluent community in the city of without a sense of having been persecuted through the centuries. Among the richest business families in India are the Parsis; for example, the controls a huge industrial empire in various parts of the country. , the powerful Prime Minister of (1966–77; 1980–84), was married to , a Parsi (no relation to ).

The process of legislating religious toleration went forward, while philosophers continued to discuss the underlying rationale.

Essay about Does India need more religious tolerance? …

The says which translates to "The truth is One, but sages call it by different Names". Consistent with this tradition, chose to be a secular country even though it was divided on religious lines. Whatever intolerance, Hindu scholars displayed towards other religions was subtle and symbolic and most likely was done to present a superior argument in defence of their own faith. Traditionally, Hindus showed their intolerance by withdrawing and avoiding contact with those whom they held in contempt, instead of using violence and aggression to strike fear in their hearts. Hinduism is perhaps the only religion in the world which showed remarkable tolerance towards other religions in difficult times and under testing conditions. Even Buddhism, which spread in India mostly through negative campaigns against Hinduism, cannot claim that credit. Criticizing other religions and showing them in poor light to attract converts to its own fold was never an approved practice in Hinduism.


Religious tolerance in india essays - Coursework Service

(1729–1781), German dramatist and philosopher, trusted in a "Christianity of Reason", in which human reason (initiated by criticism and dissent) would develop, even without help by divine revelation. His plays about Jewish characters and themes, such as "Die Juden" and "", "have usually been considered impressive pleas for social and religious toleration". The latter work contains the famous parable of the three rings, in which three sons represent the three Abrahamic religions, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Each son believes he has the one true ring passed down by their father, but judgment on which is correct is reserved to God.

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Bayle was repelled by the use of scripture to justify coercion and violence: "One must transcribe almost the whole New Testament to collect all the Proofs it affords us of that Gentleness and Long-suffering, which constitute the distinguishing and essential Character of the Gospel." He did not regard toleration as a danger to the state, but to the contrary: "If the Multiplicity of Religions prejudices the State, it proceeds from their not bearing with one another but on the contrary endeavoring each to crush and destroy the other by methods of Persecution. In a word, all the Mischief arises not from Toleration, but from the want of it."